Notes: IV. Wythe County and Evansham

Notes for Jesse Evans: IV. Wythe County and Evansham

Note 1. For a summary list of the children of Jesse and Elizabeth Evans, see Part I Note 13.

Note 2. Wythe County, Va., Will Book 1, p. 1.

Note 3. Netti Schreiner-Yantis, Montgomery County, Virginia—Circa 1790, Springfield, Va.: published by author (1972), p. 18.

Note 4. Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia, 1789, Richmond, Va.: John Dixon, printer (1789), pp. 30, 58, 60, 68. This was not the first citizens’ petition to divide Montgomery County.

Note 5. Wythe County, Va., Order Book 1, p. 5.

Note 6. Wythe County, Va., Order Book 1, pp. 6-7.

Note 7. Wythe County, Va., Deed Book 1, pp. 13-14. The document does not distinguish between the roles of Goodpasture, Crockett, and Evans. It is possible that one or two of the individuals were only providing security, but that is not stated. On August 23, 1790, Evans entered into a bond as security for Robert Adams upon Adams’s appointment as county surveyor. See Wythe County, Va., Order Book 1, p. 16.

Note 8. Wythe County, Va., Order Book 1, p. 41. A reference to Jesse Evans as a former deputy sheriff also appears in Wythe County, Va., Order Book, March 12, 1798 entry.

Note 9. Wythe County, Va., Deed Book 1, p. 67 (75 acres from Jesse Evans to Alexander Smyth on Oct. 4, 1791); Wythe County, Va., Deed Book 1, p. 284 (75 acres from Alexander Smyth to Jesse Evans on Aug. 11, 1795). The repurchase might have been prompted by Evans’s purchase from Hugh Montgomery of a parcel whose boundaries conflicted with the 75-acre parcel. See Wythe County, Va., Deed Book 1, p. 273 (March 11, 1795).

Note 10. Wythe County, Va., Entry Book 1, pp. 119-20; Wythe County, Va., Survey Book 1, p. 148. The patent for this parcel was issued in 1796. See Virginia land grant to Jesse Evans, July 29, 1796, Land Office Grants No. 34, 1796, Virginia State Land Office Grants A-Z, Microfilm Reel 100, Library of Virginia, pp. 333-34.

Note 11. Wythe County, Va., Deed Book 1, pp. 76-77 (John Breckenridge to Robert Breckenridge on Feb. 14, 1792). Within a year or two, John Breckenridge would be moving away, and Jesse Evans would serve as his attorney-in-fact to sell his land. See Wythe County, Va., Deed Book 1, p. 182 (appointment of Jesse Evans as attorney-in-fact for John and Margaret Breckenridge on Oct. 14, 1793); Wythe County, Va., Deed Book 1, p. 301 (John Breckenridge by Jesse Evans to Robert Adams on Aug. 11, 1795).

Note 12. Wythe County, Va., Entry Book 1, p. 2 (July 28, 1790 entry “by virtue of a land office Treasury Warrant for 1000 acres No. 410 & dated the 21st day of January 1790”).

Note 13. Jesse Evans also acquired a 20-acre parcel that was on a branch of Reed Creek but hasn’t otherwise been placed. The rights to this parcel were purchased from Stophel Zimmerman (Christopher Simmerman) on Nov. 2, 1799. See Wythe County, Va., Survey Book 1, p. 489. See also Virginia land grant to Jesse Evans, Jan. 30, 1811, Land Office Grants No. 61, 1810-1811, Virginia State Land Office Grants A-Z, Microfilm Reel 127, Library of Virginia, pp. 413-14.

Note 14. The following Wythe County, Va., records contain references to this parcel: Entry Book 1, p. 107 (April 19, 1793); Entry Book 1, p. 260 (Feb. 29, 1796); Entry Book 2, p. 32 (Sept. 19, 1797); Survey Book 1, p. 475 (May 16, 1798); Entry Book 2, p. 134 (Oct. 16, 1801); Deed Book 4, p. 408 (Aug. 16, 1806).

Note 15. Wythe County, Va., Survey Book 1, p. 40 (May 30, 1793).

Note 16. The origin of this name is usually attributed to the fact that Patrick Calhoun (1727-1796), a large landowner in the area, was from Abbeville, South Carolina. He was the father of Vice President John C. Calhoun (1782-1850).

Note 17. For more detail on the founding of the town, see Mary B. Kegley, Early Adventurers in the Town of Evansham, the County Seat of Wythe County, Virginia, Wytheville, Va.: Kegley Books (1998).

Note 18. The petition was submitted at the county court’s direction by the three commissioners who had been appointed by the county court to establish the town: David McGavock, James Newell, and John Adams. As a result, the petition was not signed by other citizens. See Wythe County petition to establish town, Oct. 4, 1792, Legislative Petitions, Wythe County, Microfilm Reel 205, Box 258, Folder 4, Library of Virginia.

Note 19. Hening’s Statutes (Va.), Vol. 13, Chap. 70, pp. 583-85.

Note 20. Evesham, but not Evansham, is the name of a town in England and a township in New Jersey.

Note 21. Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Begun October 21, 1792, Richmond, Va.: Augustine Davis, printer (1793), pp. 8, 17, 71, 73.

Note 22. Ibid., p. 73.

Note 23. Journal of the Senate of Virginia, October Session 1792, Microfilm, Library of Virginia. The Senate journal for this session remains in handwritten form and is not paginated.

Note 24. Hening’s Statutes (Va.), Vol. 13, Chap. 75, pp. 590-91. The full text of the act is included on the page “1792 – Acts Establishing Evansham and Academy.”

Note 25. Wythe County citizens’ petition to establish academy, Oct. 4, 1792, Legislative Petitions, Wythe County, Microfilm Reel 205, Box 258, Folder 5, Library of Virginia.

Note 26. Mary B. Kegley, Early Adventurers in the Town of Evansham, the County Seat of Wythe County, Virginia, Wytheville, Va.: Kegley Books (1998), pp. 30-31 (citing Trustees of Wythe County v. Trustees of Evansham, Case file 1818-20 (new number 673), Superior Court of Chancery, Wythe County, Va.).