Chronology

1750

  • Spring 1759: Birth of Jesse Evans (approx.)

1770

  • 1774: Jesse Evans served during Dunmore’s War ending in Battle of Point Pleasant on Oct. 10
  • 1778: Marriage of Jesse Evans and Elizabeth Breckenridge (approx.)
  • March 1778: Jesse Evans appointed lieutenant in Montgomery County militia
  • Dec. 29, 1778: Jesse Evans commissioned captain in Virginia Illinois Regiment
  • Jan.-Feb. 1779: Jesse Evans recruited company for Virginia Illinois Regiment
  • May 1779: Jesse Evans company arrived at Kaskaskia
  • June 1779: Jesse Evans company at mouth of Ohio River
  • July 1779: Jesse Evans company at Vincennes
  • Aug. 5, 1779: Jesse Evans assigned to recruiting service by Gen. George Rogers Clark
  • Nov. 10, 1779: Jesse Evans received $10,000 from Virginia for use in recruiting

1780

  • Feb. 24, 1781: Jesse Evans fought in Battle of Haw River (Pyle’s Massacre) at Burlington, N.C.
  • March 15, 1781: Battle of Guilford Court House at Greensboro, N.C.
  • Oct. 4, 1781: Jesse Evans sent resignation letter to Gen. George Rogers Clark
  • Nov. 12, 1781: Resignation letter from Jesse Evans received by Gen. George Rogers Clark
  • 1782: Jesse Evans represented Montgomery County in Virginia House of Delegates
  • 1782: Jesse Evans began acquisition of 75 acres on Cove Creek
  • Dec. 16, 1784: Jesse Evans received Virginia land grant for 75 acres on Cove Creek
  • Feb. 1, 1786: Jesse Evans called a “hog thief” by John Thompson Sayers according to 1786 lawsuit
  • Feb. 12, 1787: William Chribbs signed petition in support of forming Allegheny County
  • Sept. 4, 1787: Jesse Evans took oath as deputy sheriff of Montgomery County
  • 1788: Birth of William Becknell (approx.)
  • April 4, 1788: Jesse Evans ended service as deputy sheriff of Montgomery County
  • May 1, 1789: Marriage of William Chribbs and Elizabeth Denny in Pittsburgh

1790

  • May 26, 1790: Jesse Evans appointed captain in Wythe County militia
  • May 26, 1790: Jesse Evans recommended as Wythe County justice of the peace
  • July 21, 1790: Birth of George Washington Evans
  • Sept. 28, 1790: Jesse Evans contracted to build Wythe County courthouse
  • 1792: Birth of Mary Chribbs (approx.)
  • 1792: Jesse Evans recovered slave “Bob” from Jacob Vanhooser in Tennessee
  • Oct. 8, 1792: Jesse Evans bought a horse from George Hiney
  • Oct. 27, 1792: Jesse Evans appointed trustee of Wythe County academy
  • Oct. 29, 1792: Jesse Evans appointed trustee of new town of Evansham
  • March 28, 1793: William Chribbs reported on Indian movements to Gen. Anthony Wayne at Legionville
  • May 23, 1793: William Chribbs signed receipt at Fort Washington, Ohio
  • 1793-1794: Jesse Evans represented Wythe County in Virginia House of Delegates
  • Nov. 1, 1794: William Chribbs sold goods to John Bain at Cincinnati
  • 1795: Jesse Evans began 20 years of service as Wythe County court justice
  • July 14, 1795: Jesse Evans bought Cove Creek property from Patrick Calhoun
  • Nov. 10, 1795: Jesse Evans began 20 years of operation of New River ferry
  • Dec. 17, 1795: Marriage of Ann Evans and James McCampbell in Wythe County
  • April 1, 1796: Benjamin Van Cleve described “Chribbs’ Station” in forks of Mad River, Ohio
  • 1796: Jesse Evans promoted to major in Wythe County militia
  • Dec. 1796: Alexander Smyth showed goods to George Hiney in Richmond to pay for horse sold to Jesse Evans
  • Aug. 17, 1797: William Chribbs sold Lot 9 in Cincinnati to John & Charles Wilkins & Co.
  • Jan. 22, 1798: William Chribbs bought 640 acres from William Campbell in Macon County, Tenn.
  • April 17, 1798: William Chribbs and Robert Mitchell sued by Aron Colvin at Kaskaskia
  • May 22, 1798: William Chribbs bought property at Fort Chartres
  • July 13, 1798: William Chribbs sold lead to army at Fort Washington, Ohio
  • Aug. 11, 1798: William Chribbs paid for “secret service” by Gen. James Wilkinson
  • Aug. 14, 1798: William Chribbs paid for pirogues and canoes at mouth of Ohio River
  • Nov. 20, 1798: William Chribbs guided troops to Joshua Flaherty’s salt works on Saline River
  • April 19, 1799: William Chribbs began living with Margaret Eady at Massac for 9 months
  • April 30, 1799: William Chribbs sold goods to Solomon Thorn at Cape Girardeau
  • Aug. 29, 1799: Thomas Key killed in Randolph County (trial of William Chribbs in Oct. 1805)
  • Oct. 19, 1799: William Chribbs began living with Fanny Mitchell at Massac for 10 months
  • 1799-1807: Chribbs and Mitchell account for goods with John and Charles Wilkins

1800

  • Jan. 15, 1800: Jesse Evans appointed coroner of Wythe County
  • May 14, 1800: Birth of Hannah Chribbs
  • July 8, 1800: Jesse Evans’s main Cove Creek property sold by sheriff
  • Sept. 1, 1800: Jesse Evans resigned from Wythe County militia
  • May 16, 1801: William Chribbs contract with Oliver Ormsby to operate bakery at Wilkinsonville
  • June 11, 1801: Arbitrators awarded Thomas Herbert $100 in claim against Jesse Evans
  • Oct. 8, 1801: William Chribbs appointed collector for District of Massac
  • Jan. 28, 1802: Marriage of John Evans and Sally Newell in Wythe County
  • Summer 1802: Fire destroyed William Chribbs house at Fort Massac
  • June 25, 1803: William Chribbs wrote Col. Return J. Meigs from Nashville about Indian commerce
  • Aug. 2, 1803: William Chribbs received Fort Massac retail licenses from Robert Morrison
  • Oct. 1, 1803: William Chribbs threatened and assaulted his wife
  • May 28, 1804: William Becknell enlisted in U.S. Army First Infantry Regiment
  • Aug. 14, 1804: Jesse Evans appointed sheriff of Wythe County
  • Sept. 10, 1804: William Chribbs sold Fort Chartres property to Pierre Menard
  • Sept. 22, 1804: William Chribbs “deed of gift” to daughter Mary
  • Oct. 15, 1804: Daniel Bissell authenticated Chribbs “deed of gift” signatures
  • Oct. 19, 1804: William Chribbs property notice published in Tennessee Gazette
  • Oct. 20, 1804: Alleged attempt on William Chribbs’s life by his wife and Daniel Bissell
  • Dec. 4, 1804: Indictment of Daniel Bissell and Elizabeth Chribbs for attempt on William Chribbs’s life
  • Jan. 10, 1805: William Chribbs drafted Fort Massac citizens petition to Congress
  • May 20, 1805: William Chribbs sued by U.S. for amounts owed as collector
  • June 1805: Meeting of Aaron Burr and James Wilkinson at Fort Massac
  • Sept. 21, 1805: Jesse Evans reappointed sheriff of Wythe County
  • Oct. 11, 1805: William Chribbs acquitted of murder of Thomas Key
  • Feb. 6, 1806: Fort Massac citizens petition read on floor of House of Representatives
  • Feb. 1806: Jesse Evans ferry boat sank with David Pierce’s wagon drowning wagoneer and horses
  • Spring 1806: William Becknell posted at Fort Massac
  • July 18, 1806: Capias served on Daniel Bissell for attempt on William Chribbs’s life
  • Aug. 7, 1806: Elizabeth Chribbs filed petition for divorce
  • Aug. 18, 1806: Daniel Bissell acquitted of attempt on William Chribbs’s life
  • Sept. 22, 1806: Deposition of John and Mary McClain in Chribbs divorce
  • Oct. 1, 1806: Divorce and child custody order for William and Elizabeth Chribbs
  • Nov. 1806: Death of Daniel Bissell’s first son James (approx.)
  • Nov. 26, 1806: Presidential proclamation for arrest of Aaron Burr
  • Dec. 1806: Civil lawsuits between William Chribbs and Daniel Bissell set for trial at Kaskaskia
  • Dec. 29, 1806: Aaron Burr expedition passed Fort Massac
  • Dec. 30, 1806: Daniel Bissell visited Aaron Burr
  • Jan. 18, 1807: Barges of William Chribbs seized by Daniel Bissell
  • April 9, 1807: William Chribbs sold interest in barge “Progress” to Timothy Merrick at New Orleans
  • June 1, 1807: Chribbs and McCawley sold McClains’ home, Lot 15, in Smithland, Ky.
  • June 19, 1807: William Chribbs wrote from New Orleans to the Secretary of War about Daniel Bissell
  • Sept. 1807: Daniel Bissell testified at treason trial of Aaron Burr in Richmond
  • March 5, 1808: Appeal allowed of Wilkins judgment against Chribbs & Mitchell in New Orleans
  • May-Dec. 1808: William Becknell posted at Washington
  • Jan. 1809: William Becknell posted at Fort Massac
  • Feb. 2, 1809: Marriage of Elizabeth Denny and Drury Prichard
  • March 8, 1809: William Chribbs not found in New Orleans for service of summons
  • May 28, 1809: William Becknell discharged at Fort Massac

1810

  • by March 1810: William Becknell moved to Missouri Territory
  • May 12, 1810: William Chribbs shipped cotton from Natchidoches for John Sibley
  • Sept. 3, 1810: Jesse Evans gave bond for execution on George Hiney judgment
  • Oct. 11, 1810: Stephen Sanders applied to operate New River ferry
  • Dec. 24, 1810: William Chribbs sold John Sibley 2121 lb. of bacon at Natchidoches
  • March 14, 1811: Marriage of Joseph Evans and Elizabeth “Betsey” Smith in Wythe County
  • Nov. 29, 1811: Drury Prichard served on jury in St. Charles
  • Nov. 29, 1811: William Becknell on St. Charles jury same day as James Morrison and Drury Prichard
  • May 1812: William Becknell provided Robert McKnight a horse and gun at Boone’s Lick for Santa Fe trip
  • May 27, 1812: Drury Prichard bought lot in St. Charles from Louis Barada
  • Aug. 30, 1812: Alleged assault on Ebenezer Ross by Drury Prichard in St. Charles
  • Sept. 22, 1812: Court martial of Sgt. Drury Prichard in St. Charles militia
  • 1813: William Chribbs emigrated to Spanish Texas (according to his heirs in 1838)
  • Feb. 4, 1813: Marriage of Nancy Evans and George King in Wythe County
  • May 19, 1813: William Becknell enlisted as sergeant in U.S. Mounted Rangers at St. Charles
  • Sept. 6, 1813: William Becknell’s first deposition in McKnight v. Morrison lawsuit (given in St. Louis)
  • Oct. 15, 1813: Settlement agreement between Jesse Evans and Stephen Sanders
  • Jan. 11, 1814: Jesse Evans received license to operate ordinary at New River ferry
  • June 22, 1814: William Becknell’s second deposition in McKnight v. Morrison lawsuit (given in Femme Osage Township of St. Charles County)
  • July 13, 1814: William Becknell appointed ensign by Gen. Benjamin Howard
  • Summer 1814: William Becknell witnessed Howard/Callaway agreement at Cap au Gris
  • Sept. 4, 1814: William Becknell fought at Battle of Credit Island
  • Sept. 1814: William Becknell traveled to St. Louis to meet Gen. Benjamin Howard
  • Sept. 1814: William Becknell traveled to Femme Osage Creek to meet Nancy Callaway
  • Sept. 1814: Marriage of William Becknell and Mary Chribbs (approx.)
  • Dec. 24, 1814: Drury Prichard bought St. Charles lot at 340 South Main Street where he operated a tavern
  • 1815: Birth of Mary Jane Becknell (Rogers) (approx.)
  • March 7, 1815: William Becknell reported from Camp Clemson on Capt. James Callaway’s death
  • May 19, 1815: Jesse Evans agreement with Thomas Jackson for sale of New River ferry
  • June 7, 1815: Death of Elizabeth Breckenridge Evans
  • June 20, 1815: William Becknell discharged from U.S. Mounted Rangers at Woods Fort (Troy, Mo.)
  • Sept. 1, 1815: Jesse Evans deed of New River ferry to Thomas Jackson
  • Sept. 28, 1815: Jesse Evans left Virginia for Cote Sans Dessein, Mo.
  • Oct. 9, 1815: Prospect K. Robbins contracted to survey Fifth Principal Meridian
  • March 17, 1816: Marriage of Elizabeth Evans and Prospect K. Robbins in St. Charles
  • May 1816: Drury Prichard bought tavern license in St. Charles
  • May 4, 1816: William Becknell deposition in Callaway v. Howard lawsuit
  • Sept. 2, 1816: Drury and Elizabeth Prichard sold first Main Street lot in St. Charles
  • Sept. 1816: Jesse Evans traveled from St. Louis to Vincennes with John Scripps
  • Oct. 22, 1816: Joseph Evans and Prospect K. Robbins bought Main Street lot in St. Charles
  • Autumn 1816: Birth of William A. Becknell, Jr., in Howard County (approx.)
  • Dec. 1816: William Becknell contract with Joseph Robidoux to use keel boat following spring
  • 1817: Drury Prichard lived in Upper Cuivre Township (Troy) of St. Charles County
  • Jan. 2, 1817: Prospect K. Robbins and Joseph Evans contracted to survey St. Charles County
  • Aug. 12, 1817: William Becknell bought Lots 52 and 53 in Franklin
  • Oct. 7, 1817: Jesse Evans bought property at Cote Sans Dessein
  • Nov. 11, 1817: William Becknell served on Howard County jury
  • 1817: Marriage of George Washington Evans and Hannah Chribbs (approx.)
  • 1817: Birth of John C. Becknell (approx.)
  • 1817: Birth of Jesse Chribbs Evans (approx.)
  • 1818: Jesse Evans, Jr. appointed first postmaster at Cote Sans Dessein
  • March 21, 1818: Drury and Elizabeth Prichard sold 340 South Main Street lot in St. Charles to Uriah Devore
  • Aug. 20, 1818: George W. Evans and Drury Prichard bought property at Cote Sans Dessein
  • Autumn 1818: William Becknell bought ferry license in Howard County (approx.)
  • 1819: Birth of Lucy Becknell (Smiley) (approx.)
  • 1819: Drury Prichard moved to Franklin and began operating tavern
  • Aug. 18, 1819: William Becknell sold 2/3 interest in Boone’s Lick property to Morrison brothers

1820

  • Jan. 8, 1820: William Becknell bought 1/2 interest in 160 acres in Macon County from Drury Prichard
  • Aug. 18, 1820: William Becknell lost election for Howard County representative
  • April 21, 1821: William Becknell hired slaves Tom, Aaron, Kain, and Lucy from Thomas A. Smith
  • May 14, 1821: Jesse Evans reported to William Clark on delivery of corn to Indians
  • June 25, 1821: William Becknell published initial notice for trip “to the westward”
  • Aug. 4, 1821: Organizational meeting at home of Ezekiel Williams for trip “to the westward”
  • Aug. 14, 1821: William Becknell published second notice for trip “to the westward”
  • Sept. 1, 1821: William Becknell departed on Santa Fe trip
  • Sept. 1821: William Becknell’s property attached in lawsuit by Henry V. Bingham
  • Dec. 13, 1821: William Becknell departed from Santa Fe
  • Jan. 30, 1822: William Becknell returned to Franklin from Santa Fe
  • 1822: Elizabeth Prichard began living in the Becknell household (approx.)
  • 1822: Becknell household lived on north side of Missouri River across from the Arrow Rock
  • May 1822: William Becknell sued by Henry Dever over slave “Sally”
  • May 23, 1822: William Becknell sold remainder of Boone’s Lick property to Morrison brothers
  • Late May 1822: William Becknell departed on second trip to Santa Fe
  • Sept. 1822: Elizabeth Prichard gave witness testimony in Dever v. Becknell trial
  • Sept. 26, 1822: Jury verdict for William Becknell in lawsuit by Henry Dever over slave “Sally”
  • Late Oct. 1822: William Becknell returned from second trip to Santa Fe
  • April 22, 1823: William Becknell’s “Journal” published in Missouri Intelligencer
  • May 1, 1824: William Becknell alleged assault on James Castner in Cooper County
  • July 1824: William Becknell indicted in Cooper County for assault on James Castner
  • Oct. 29, 1824: William Becknell wrote from Santa Cruz to New Mexico governor
  • Nov. 5, 1824: William Becknell began Green River trapping expedition
  • May 1825: William Becknell returned to Missouri from trapping expedition
  • June 25, 1825: “Capt. Becknell’s Tour” published in Missouri Intelligencer
  • July – Oct. 1825: William Becknell supplied Santa Fe Road Commission surveyors
  • Nov. 22, 1825: Jesse Evans purchased Lot 341 in Jefferson City
  • April 26, 1826: Mary Becknell received husband’s letter with instructions for Abiel Leonard
  • Early May 1826: Mary Becknell wrote to Abiel Leonard about pending lawsuit
  • June 20, 1826: William Becknell served with summons for assault on James Castner
  • 1827: Death of Jesse Evans, Jr. (approx.)
  • June 15, 1827: William Becknell appointed Saline County justice of the peace for 4 years
  • Oct. 29, 1827: Jesse Evans purchased Lot 286 in Jefferson City
  • April 10, 1828: Marriage of Joanna Reeder Evans to John Howell (son of Francis Howell, Sr.)
  • 1828: Jesse Evans moved across Missouri River to Gasconade (later Osage) County
  • 1828: Birth of Cornelia Becknell (Evans later Collins) (approx.)
  • Nov. 1828: William Becknell elected Saline County representative in Missouri General Assembly
  • April 4, 1829: William Becknell wrote A.M. Payne from Little Arrow Rock
  • July 1829: William Becknell’s Saline County militia company mustered
  • Aug. 8, 1829: Alonzo Pearson wrote militia orders to William Becknell
  • Sept. 1, 1829: William Becknell alleged fight with William Allen Gwinn
  • Dec. 30, 1829: Mary Becknell wrote Alonzo Pearson from Little Arrow Rock about brother John’s estate

1830

  • 1830: Marriage of Mary Jane Becknell and John K. Rogers (approx.)
  • June 1830: Mary Ann Parsons sued Alonzo Pearson for abandonment
  • Nov. 1830: William Becknell elected to second term as Saline County representative
  • Dec. 8, 1830: William Becknell introduced bill for Pearson/Sappington divorce
  • Dec. 18, 1830: Missouri House passed Pearson/Sappington divorce bill
  • Dec. 24, 1830: Missouri Senate tabled Pearson/Sappington divorce bill
  • Dec. 24, 1830: William Becknell wrote Dr. John Sappington about divorce bill
  • Dec. 26, 1830: Sen. John Miller wrote M.M. Marmaduke about divorce bill
  • Dec. 30, 1830: M.M. Marmaduke wrote Sen. Edward Bates about divorce bill
  • Jan. 1, 1831: Missouri Senate passed Pearson/Sappington divorce bill
  • Jan. 4, 1831: Sen. Edward Bates wrote M.M. Marmaduke about divorce bill
  • Jan. 13, 1831: Missouri governor signed Pearson/Sappington divorce bill
  • June 27, 1831: William Becknell found not guilty for fighting with William Allen Gwinn
  • Aug. 19, 1831: Jesse Evans purchased Lots 37 and 51 in Jefferson City
  • Jan. 29, 1834: William and Mary Becknell sold Saline City property to Burton Lawless
  • Feb. 6, 1834: William Becknell purchased slaves Phillis and Harvey at Lexington, Mo.
  • Dec. 3, 1834: Jesse Evans assigned veterans benefits to son Joseph and grandsons
  • 1835: William Becknell sold slaves Phillis, Harvey, and Martin to son John
  • 1835: Marriage of Lucy Becknell and F.J.C. Smiley (approx.)
  • Autumn 1835: William and Mary Becknell moved to Texas
  • Dec. 17, 1835: William A. Becknell, Jr., arrived in Texas
  • Dec. 22, 1835: F.J.C. Smiley and wife Lucy arrived in Texas
  • Dec. 1835: William Becknell hosted Davy Crockett according to local tradition
  • Jan. 14, 1836: Jesse Evans granted patents for 215 acres on Luzon Branch
  • May 28, 1836: William Becknell wrote to Sam Houston offering service of Red River militia
  • June 25, 1836: Gen. Thomas Green wrote to William Becknell authorizing Red River Blues
  • Aug. 26, 1836: William Becknell’s Red River Blues stationed at Victoria, Tex.
  • Sept. 1836: William Becknell arrested John Hallett on Lavaca River
  • Oct. 3, 1836: William Becknell sworn in as Red River representative Texas congress
  • Oct. 12, 1836: William Becknell replaced by Collin McKinney as Red River representative
  • Oct. 17, 1837: John K. Rogers and wife Mary Jane arrived in Texas
  • 1838: William Becknell bought 1000 boxes of Dr. Sappington’s Anti-Fever Pills for $2000
  • Feb. 5, 1838: William Becknell granted “head of household” right to Texas land
  • Feb. 5, 1838: William A. Becknell, Jr., granted single man’s right to Texas land
  • April 1838: “Heirs of Wm. Cribbs” granted right to Texas land based on 1813 emigration
  • Jan. 19, 1839: Elizabeth Prichard deeded Callaway County land to grandsons Jesse C. Evans and William B. Evans
  • Feb. 5, 1839: Jesse Evans veterans pension declaration taken by William Scott
  • 1839: Marriage of William A. Becknell, Jr., and Malinda Elizabeth Click (approx.)

1840

  • 1840: Marriage of John C. Becknell and Mary Elizabeth Guest (approx.)
  • March 27, 1840: Assault charge against John and William Becknell dismissed
  • Sept. 12, 1840: William Becknell wrote to Dr. John Sappington to settle note for pills
  • Oct. 1, 1840: Jesse Evans granted patents for two 40-acre parcels on Luzon Branch
  • 1840: Joseph and Betsy Evans moved in with Jesse Evans in Osage County (approx.)
  • Nov. 11, 1841: Jesse Evans executed will
  • 1843: Marriage of Cornelia Becknell and William Evans (approx.)
  • Feb. 6, 1843: William Becknell signed bond to Thomas J. Shannon for 1000 acres
  • March 12, 1843: John Jameson retained Abiel Leonard to help represent heirs of Jesse Evans
  • March 23, 1843: Joseph Evans requested Abiel Leonard to represent him in estate dispute
  • July 28, 1843: Death of Jesse Evans
  • Aug. 31, 1843: Osage County probate court refused to admit Jesse Evans’s will
  • May 13, 1844: Jesse Evans will contest suit transferred to Cole County
  • Aug. 1, 1844: Jesse Evans posthumously granted patent for 80 acres spanning Stony Ridge
  • May 2, 1845: Cole County jury failed to reach verdict in Jesse Evans will contest suit
  • Jan. 1846: Death of George Washington Evans (approx.)
  • Feb. 27, 1846: Second Cole County jury found Jesse Evans will was valid
  • March 30, 1846: Jesse Evans will filed in Osage County
  • April 1846: Jesse Evans’s slaves Peter, Charity, and Elizabeth freed (approx.)
  • May 13, 1846: Peter, Charity, and Elizabeth sell land rights to Jesse Evans’s heirs
  • Oct. 6, 1846: Death of Joseph Evans
  • 1847: Thomas Shannon sold William Becknell’s 1000-acre parcel to brother James Shannon
  • 1848: Mary Becknell and son John encounter French Icarians
  • 1848: Death of William Evans, husband of Cornelia Becknell (approx.)
  • 1848: William Becknell injured and crippled for life (approx.)
  • June 6, 1848: Lawsuit by Jesse Evans’s freed slave Peter dismissed by probate court
  • Sept. 1848: James Evans sued George King over Jesse Evans’s pension
  • Dec. 5, 1848: Osage County jury verdict in favor of Jesse Evans’s freed slave Charity
  • Dec. 6, 1848: Osage County court judgment in favor of Jesse Evans’s freed slave Elizabeth
  • 1849: James Shannon resold William Becknell’s 1000-acre parcel to brother Thomas Shannon
  • 1849: William and Mary Becknell move to son John’s land in Titus County (approx.)

1850

  • 1850: John C. Becknell granted 10-year charter for toll bridge over Sulphur River
  • Oct. 1850: Callaway County jury verdict for George King in pension lawsuit by James Evans
  • Feb. 17, 1852: Death of George King
  • 1852: Missouri Supreme Court decision in Evans v. King
  • Nov. 1, 1852: M.M. Marmaduke sued Thomas Shannon and William Becknell for land
  • 1853: John C. Becknell emigrated to California (approx.)
  • 1853: Marriage of Cornelia Becknell Evans and James Collins (approx.)
  • May 30, 1853: William Becknell made bounty land claim for War of 1812 service
  • Aug. 16, 1853: William Becknell received 3500-acre land grant for “Becknell’s Prairie”
  • Nov. 22, 1853: William Becknell gave deposition in court case by M.M. Marmaduke
  • Dec. 4, 1854: M.M. Marmaduke won jury verdict and awarded 1000-acre parcel
  • 1855: Texas Supreme Court upheld M.M. Marmaduke’s jury verdict against Thomas Shannon
  • April 25, 1856: Death of William Becknell
  • Dec. 29, 1856: William A. Becknell, Jr., appointed administrator of father’s estate
  • 1857: John C. Becknell began living with Electa Stowell in Mariposa County, Cal. (approx.)
  • Feb. 1857: Mary Becknell assigned ownership of slaves Martin and Phillis and their son Martin
  • Feb. 7, 1858: Death of William A. Becknell, Jr., in horse accident
  • March 29, 1858: Malinda Becknell appointed administratrix of husband’s estate
  • March 29, 1858: Mary Becknell appointed administratrix de bonis non of husband’s estate
  • Jan. 4, 1859: Becknells’ slave Harvey sold to Lorenzo D. Henderson
  • Jan. 28, 1859: Becknell’s Prairie land divided among heirs in 7 lots

1860

  • Feb. 25, 1860: Final settlement of estate of William Becknell
  • Oct. 24, 1860: Mary Becknell authorized Nathan Smith Richardson to collect U.S. Army payments due to William Chribbs
  • 1860: Mary Becknell wrote letter to Hannah Evans about international relations (approx.)
  • Dec. 20, 1861: Mary Becknell deeded 6 acres to Methodist Episcopal Church South for building and cemetery
  • Oct. 7, 1862: Mary Becknell made her will
  • April 25, 1864: Death of Mary Becknell
  • 1868: Death of Cornelia Becknell Collins and birth of last Becknell grandchild, Dora Collins (approx.)

1870

  • May 10, 1870: John C. Becknell deed Sulphur River land to children
  • Feb. 21, 1871: Martin and Phillis Becknell awarded $500 on claim against Mary Becknell’s estate
  • March 7, 1871: First parcel of land sold from Mary Becknell’s estate

1890

  • 1893: Death of John C. Becknell in California

Copyright 2012-2014 Gregory Hancks

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