Notes: IX. Texas and a New Republic

Notes for William Becknell: IX. Texas and a New Republic

Note 1. Sept. 12, 1833 note, William Hughes v. William Becknell, Cooper County, Mo., Circuit Court Case Files, Box 6, Folder 18 (Microfilm C37277), Missouri State Archives.

Note 2. June 1834 judgment, William Hughes v. William Becknell, Cooper County, Mo., Circuit Court Book 3, p. 42.

Note 3. Howard County, Mo., Deed Book Z, pp. 192-93 (William and Mary Becknell to Burton Lawless, Jan. 29, 1834, NE fractional quarter of Section 1, Township 50, Range 19 in Saline County and SW fractional quarter of Section 10, Township 50, Range 18 in Howard County). The sale was also recorded in Saline County, Mo., Deed Book G, pp. 220-21. See Part III for additional information about the property.

Note 4. Red River County, Tex., Deed Book C, pp. 374-75 (Jesse Nave to William Becknell, Feb. 6, 1834).

Note 5. William Becknell to Sam Houston, May 28, 1836, Thomas J. Green Papers, #289, Folder 6, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Note 6. Arkansas was admitted as a state on June 15, 1836.

Note 7. Mary Jane Rogers to Mary Becknell, Sept. 28 and Oct. 6, 1836 (private collection). The letter was found in the Bible given as a wedding gift in 1865 to Mary Adaline Rogers and Squire Shedrick Griggs from Daniel C. and Louisa B. Griggs. Parts of the letter, which survives only in pieces, were written by Mary Jane’s brother, John C. Becknell.

Note 8. See Part III Note 1. William Becknell’s codefendant (listed as J.F. Smiley) in the 1829 claim of trespass by Zachariah Hanks may be the same person. See Part VIII Note 7. F.J.C. Smiley served as a witness to a Becknell transaction in Missouri about 1835. See Part X Note 13 and accompanying text. In 1836 in Texas, F.J.C. Smiley served as a sergeant in the Red River Blues described in this Part IX. In the early 1830s, Smiley had made an application at the General Land Office in Fayette, Mo., and, on Sept. 30, 1835, was granted the NE quarter of the NW quarter of Section 23, Township 48, Range 20 in Pettis County. See Patent to Francis Jackson Carter Smiley, Sept. 30, 1835, Document 6003, Accession MO0520_.499, Bureau of Land Management General Land Office, U.S. Department of the Interior (available online at www.glorecords.blm.gov).

Note 9. Callaway County, Mo., Deed Book F, pp. 219-20 (Elizabeth Pritchard to Jesse Evans and William Evans, Jan. 19, 1839, SW quarter, Section 30, Township 45, Range 9, “which she has as widow and heir of Drury R. Pritchard deceased”). Elizabeth Prichard acknowledged the deed in person on Jan. 19 in front of George King, a justice of the peace who was the brother-in-law of her daughter Hannah.

Note 10. No subsequent records refer to Elizabeth Prichard, although it is conceivable that she was inaccurately listed on the 1840 U.S. Federal Census for Gasconade County, Missouri, as the 50- to 60-year-old white female in the Joseph Evans household adjacent to the household of her son-in-law George Evans. She would have been at least 65 at the time.

Note 11. Pat B. Clark, The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County, Dallas, Tex.: Mathis, Van Nort & Co. (1937), pp. 13-15.

Note 12. Larry M. Beachum, William Becknell: Father of the Santa Fe Trade, El Paso, Tex.: Texas Western Press (1982), pp. 56-57.

Note 13. Pat B. Clark, The History of Clarksville and Old Red River County, Dallas, Tex.: Mathis, Van Nort & Co. (1937), p. 17.

Note 14. William Becknell to Sam Houston, May 28, 1836, and muster roll, April 28, 1836 (certified May 28, 1836), Thomas J. Green Papers, #289, Folder 6, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Note 15. Thomas J. Green to William Becknell, June 25, 1836, Thomas J. Green Papers, #289, Folder 7, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Note 16. Thomas J. Green Papers, #289, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The documents in the Green papers related to Becknell are:

  • April 28, 1836 muster roll (certified May 28, 1836), Folder 6;
  • May 28, 1836 letter from Becknell to Houston (forwarded to Green), Folder 6;
  • June 25, 1836 letter from Green to Becknell, Folder 7;
  • July 14, 1836 muster roll, Folder 11;
  • Aug. 26, 1836 muster roll, Folder 11;
  • Sept. 7, 1836 letter from Green to Becknell, Folder 12;
  • Sept. 13, 1836 letter from Becknell to Green, Folder 12;
  • Oct. 14, 1836 muster roll, Folder 12;
  • Oct. 18, 1836 letter from Becknell to Green, Folder 14;
  • Nov. 4, 1836 letter from Becknell to Green, Folder 14 (erroneously dated Oct. 4, 1836).

Note 17. Larry M. Beachum, William Becknell: Father of the Santa Fe Trade, El Paso, Tex.: Texas Western Press (1982), pp. 58-62.

Note 18. See Judith N. McArthur, “Hallett, Margaret Leatherbury,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhacj), uploaded June 15, 2010, Texas State Historical Association.

Note 19. Larry M. Beachum, William Becknell: Father of the Santa Fe Trade, El Paso, Tex.: Texas Western Press (1982), pp. 60-62.

Note 20. Collin McKinney (1766-1861) was one of the drafters and signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence. Both Collin County, Texas, and its county seat, McKinney, were named for him.

Note 21. William Becknell to Thomas J. Green, Oct. 18, 1836, Thomas J. Green Papers, #289, Folder 14, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Note 22. William Becknell to Thomas J. Green, Nov. 4, 1836 [erroneously dated Oct. 4, 1836], Thomas J. Green Papers, #289, Folder 14, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Based on other documentation of Becknell’s activities, this letter written at Nacadoches must have been drafted on November 4 instead of October 4.